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OVOPUR
Wed, 16th October 2013

The idea of incorporating a free-standing water filter into contemporary kitchen design was always somewhat scary for me. Can you envision  a typical office water cooler in the corner of a modern, clean-lined, elegant interior?

Imagine my relief when I found THIS:

 

 

Aquaovo, the manufacturer of the award-winning OVOPUR, calls it a “functional and performant piece of art” – truly a product that fuses age-old traditions with tomorrow’s trends.

(Couldn’t describe it better!)

 

 

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Filed Under: JUST SEEN

HOT & NOT

 

My jaw just dropped when I first saw this chair. Its bold texture mixed with neutral color, traditional weave juxtaposed with modern shape and materials – it all makes someone like me, who loves every contrast – any contrast – a very, very happy person.

 

AMI armchair by Paola Lenti

AMI armchair by Paola Lenti

 

This wonderfully soft-looking chair is a part of a collection designed by Francesco Rota for Paola Lenti. Constructed on a stainless steel base, featuring chunky weave combined with soft cushion, and available in array of vibrant colors, it can find a home in any modern and youthful setting, both indoors and outdoors. Available through Luminaire.

 

 

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18th Sep 2013

JUST SEEN

 

One of the latest trends in home decor is inspired by warm  Norwegian knitwear patterns. Scandinavian design company Menu came out with Nordic Wool thermo cups featuring a vibrant orange and yellow or red and lime interior. Grab a set of two for yourself or as a thoughtful winter gift. You can get them here.

 

MENU Nordic Wool Thermo Cups

 

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21st Dec 2011

JUST SEEN

I’ve always been advocating the principle of form following function, coined in 1896 by American architect Louis Sullivan. I believe that the shape of a furniture piece should be based upon its intended function.  Any interior filled by a purely decorative object the size of, let’s say, a dining room table, is for me a wasted space.

Having dinner at this table would be practically impossible to most men known to me (women would try to somehow squeeze in, as to not hurt the hostess’s feelings).

On the other hand, I appreciate multi-functional pieces like this one:

Somewhat a cross between a chair and a side table, can you imagine it as a bedside table in a summer house? Or as a side table by the sofa? Or maybe in a modern teen’s room, to hide all that stuff her live depends on?

I wonder what your opinion is on the following red leather writing table. Is the form overpowering the function? Is it a waste of space, or a useful piece of furniture? Do you love it or hate it?

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6th Jul 2010

THE WAY WE WORK

Today (as on every April 7th) we celebrate No Housework Day. Although many of us delegate our chores, hire housecleaning services, or even have a full-time housekeeper, we still spend time making our beds, organizing our stuff, or picking up after our kids. But time is a very precious commodity – probably the one we value most. Shouldn’t we be spending it with our family and friends, doing what we love to do, instead of using it up for cleaning and caring for our material belongings? What if your house were to be designed as low-maintenance, making it possible to minimize the daily upkeep (giving you back your time to enjoy)?

Many years ago I read a book by Don Aslett titled Make Your House Do the Housework, which changed the way I look at the space I’m in. From that time on I see the interior design not only as a combination of form (the aesthetic aspect) and function (the utility factor). I am able to see the amount of time and money that is or will be spent by the owners on the process of maintaining it. This idea is one of the basic principles of healthy interior design my company, Bozena Studio, promotes and pioneers in (find out more on Healthy Interior Design blog).

I bet you’re eager to find out how to make your house to clean itself (I remember I couldn’t wait to get my hands on this book!). Some of the author’s ideas include:

  • Before you buy anything for your home, find out if it will: rot, fade, stain, dent, peel, scratch, rust, soil, shrink (in other words: what it’s made of).
  • To minimize dust, use radiant heating (hot water or electric). Forced air systems move dust around, dirtying drapes, walls, etc. (it can eventually irritate your respiratory system – I know I’m susceptible to this).
  • Get rid of excess furniture and stuff – it eliminates dust-gathering surfaces and floor obstacles to fast and efficient cleaning. If possible, suspend or build-in some furniture items.
  • Buy self-maintaining furniture: sofas with attached pillows, no-nap upholstery fabric or self-straightening swivel chairs (like the Alster chair I just saw at the Ligne Roset showroom – a wonderful idea for all the Miss Perfects like me).
  • Pick the right light fixtures. Avoid flat-bowl ceiling mounted ones (they collect grease and bugs and are hard to clean), minimize the use of floor lamps (many surfaces to dust, cords obstruct the path of vacuum cleaner). Choose hanging or built-in lamps, smooth surface lampshades, and use long-life light sources like LED or fluorescent.

For almost 10 years I’ve been trying out many of those techniques. Some require the home to undergo a remodel or general redesign (like the installation of radiant heating and low-maintenance tile flooring with minimal grout line), but most can be applied to  any existing home, just by changing our way of thinking (like using door mats and taking off your shoes after entering the house).

Bozena Studio clients are made aware of the future maintenance of a space we design for them, and based on this knowledge they are able to make educated choices regarding the selection of materials and items for their project. I sincerely believe that their time and money is not being spent on maintaining their new space, but on the things they love to do: career, family, friends.

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7th Apr 2010
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